Conservationists give wings to black-necked cranes on ‘roof of the world’

This photo taken on April 7, 2024 shows the migrating black-necked cranes at the A Rag Wetland in Damxung county of Lhasa, Southwest China’s Xizang autonomous region. [Photo/Xinhua]

LHASA — The black-necked cranes, a species under first-class state protection in China, stop by and forage at the A Rag Wetland in Damxung county of Lhasa, Southwest China’s Xizang autonomous region, during their returning journey to the north every spring. It is the busiest period of the year for the wildlife conservationists of the county.

Nyima Dondrup, one of the local wildlife conservationists, has been guarding the black-necked cranes at the wetland for 15 years. “I find my efforts valuable when I watch the black-necked cranes flying,” said Nyima Dondrup.

Now, over 70 black-necked crane observation areas have been established in Xizang. The population of the species has gradually increased over the years, rising from under 3,000 in 1995 to over 10,000 now.